20 Illustrations of Famous Shakespeare Quotes

William Shakespeare turns 451 today (happy birthday, ol’ Willy!).

To commemorate, we’re opening up the eNotes vaults to share some original artwork that brings to life the Bard’s works. We partnered with Yumi Sakugawa, a published author and artist, to recreate some of your favorite, iconic Shakespearean scenes. Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post, as we pick Yumi’s brain about her work and artistic process.

If you want to learn more about a quote’s context within its scene, click on each image for an in-depth analysis. Be sure to let us know your favorite(s) in the comments!

1. What’s in a Name?

Juliet:
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.

Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2)


 2. To-morrow, and To-morrow, and To-morrow

Macbeth:
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

Macbeth Act 5, scene 5, 19–28


 3. The Lady Doth Protest Too Much

Player Queen:
Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
If once I be a widow, ever I be a wife!

Player King:
‘Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here a while,
My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
The tedious day with sleep.

Player Queen:
Sleep rock thy brain,
And never come mischance between us twain!

Hamlet:
Madam, how like you this play?

Queen:
The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

Hamlet Act 3, scene 2, 222–230


4. If Music Be the Food of Love

Duke Orsino:
If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.

Twelfth Night Act 1, scene 1, 1–3


5. All the World’s a Stage

05_AllTheWorldsAStage

Jaques:
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages.

As You Like It Act 2, scene 7, 139–143


6. To Be, or Not To Be

06_tobenottobe

Hamlet:
To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep,
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to: ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there’s the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause—there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life.
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th’oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of dispriz’d love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovere’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry
And lose the name of action.

Hamlet Act 3, scene 1, 55–87


7. To Sleep, Perchance to Dream

08_ToSleepPerchanceToDream

Hamlet:
To sleep, perchance to dream-
ay, there’s the rub.

Hamlet (III, i, 65-68)


8. There Are More Things in Heaven and Earth

07_MoreThingsHeavenAndEarth

Hamlet:
Swear by my sword
Never to speak of this that you have heard.

Ghost:
[Beneath] Swear by his sword.

Hamlet:
Well said, old mole, canst work i’ th’ earth so fast?
A worthy pioner! Once more remove, good friends.

Horatio:
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

Hamlet:
And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Hamlet Act 1, scene 5, 159–167


9. O Romeo, Romeo, Wherefore Art Thou Romeo?

09_WhereArtThouRomeo

Juliet:
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

Romeo:
[Aside] Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?

Juliet:
‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy:
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot,
Nor arm nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
and for thy name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

Romeo And Juliet Act 2, scene 2, 33–49


10. We Are Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made on

10_SuchSTuffAsDreamsAreMadeOf

Prospero:
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d tow’rs, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

The Tempest Act 4, scene 1, 148–158


11. Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

11_PartingIsSuchSweetSorrow

Juliet:
‘Tis almost morning, I would have thee gone—
And yet no farther than a wan-ton’s bird,
That lets it hop a little from his hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silken thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

Romeo:
I would I were thy bird.

Juliet:
Sweet, so would I,
Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow. [Exit above]

Romeo And Juliet Act 2, scene 2, 176–185


12. Now is the Winter of Our Discontent

12_WinterOfOurDiscontent

Richard:
Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this son of York;
And all the clouds that low’r’d upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.

Richard The Third Act 1, scene 1, 1–4


13. What Piece of a Work is Man 

13_whatpieceworkisman

Hamlet:
What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how
infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and
admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like
a god! the beauty of the world, the paragon of animals—and yet,
to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me—
nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.

Rosencrantz:
My lord, there was no such stuff in my thoughts.

Hamlet Act 2, scene 2, 303–312


14. Love Looks Not With the Eyes

14_LoveEyeOfMind

Helena:
Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (I, i, 234)


15. Something is Rotten in the State of Denmark

15_RottenStateOfDenmark

Horatio:
He waxes desperate with imagination.

Marcellus:
Let’s follow. ‘Tis not fit thus to obey him.

Horatio:
Have after. To what issue will this come?

Marcellus:
Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

Horatio:
Heaven will direct it.

Marcellus:
Nay, let’s follow him. [Exeunt.]

Hamlet Act 1, scene 4, 87–91


16. Out, Damn’d Spot

16_OutDamnedSpot

Doctor:
What is it she does now? Look how she rubs her hands.

Gentlewoman:
It is an accustom’d action with her, to seem thus
washing her hands. I have known her continue in this a quarter of
an hour.

Lady Macbeth:
Yet here’s a spot.

Doctor:
Hark, she speaks. I will set down what comes from her, to
satisfy my remembrance the more strongly.

Lady Macbeth:
Out, damn’d spot! out, I say!—One; two: why, then
’tis time to do’t.—Hell is murky.—Fie, my lord, fie, a soldier, and
afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our
pow’r to accompt?—Yet who would have thought the old man to
have had so much blood in him?

Macbeth Act 5, scene 1, 26–40


17. The Fault, Dear Brutus, is Not in Our Stars

17_TheFaultIsNotInOurStars

Cassius:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Julius Caesar (I, ii, 140-141)


18. Prodigious Birth of Love it is to Me

18_ProdigiousBirth

Juliet:
Go ask his name.—If he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding-bed.

Nurse:
His name is Romeo, and a Montague,
The only son of your great enemy.

Juliet:
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.

Romeo And Juliet Act 1, scene 5, 134–141


19. All That Glisters 

19_AllThatGlistens

Prince of Morocco:
All that glisters is not gold.

The Merchant of Venice (II, vii)


20. Et Tu

20_EtuBrutus

Caesar:
Et tu, Brute?

Julius Caesar (III, i, 77)

3 Comments

  1. Pimion

    Love these! My favourite illustration is the one for We Are Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made on 🙂

Comments are closed.