The Nature of Leadership: Engaging our Youth to Become Better Leaders

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Excellent leadership skills can come naturally to some, but early experiences impact our adult leadership potential. At a young age, children learn to develop leadership skills by being nurtured and encouraged by adults such as parents, family members, teachers and caregivers. Qualities imposed by adults, such as moral development, communication, and diversity can all greatly affect the way children become leaders. Reflect on your own leadership qualities to see how you can better impact young adults to become future leaders.

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eNotes Homework Help: November Discussion Starters

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Our Homework Help service helps students and teachers on their toughest academic questions. Our Educators have answered more than 300,000 questions–some straightforward with decidedly black/white answers, and others more open to interpretation and, consequently, discussion.

Each month we’re compiling some of our favorite Homework Help questions to initiate debate or rich conversation in your classroom. Enjoy! Continue Reading ›

Top E-learning Trends You Can Implement Immediately in Your Classroom

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What do we talk about when we talk about e-learning?

In the past, most courses and learning activities fell on one side of a dichotomy: they were either instructor-led or computer-based, either online or off, either synchronous or asynchronous. Today, the distinction is not quite so clear. Although there are still plenty of e-learning-only courses, blended courses are becoming increasingly popular from elementary to corporate classrooms. Even courses that may not specifically be “blended” are incorporating more digital elements and activities. In this new environment, e-learning is becoming less of a special category and more just a way to describe what happens in classrooms everywhere, every day. Continue Reading ›

Century-Old Lesson: Chalkboards From 1917 Discovered in Oklahoma Classroom

Educators of Emerson High School in Oklahoma were shocked when contractors began working to update four classrooms; they uncovered chalkboards chock full of pristine writings and drawings dating back to 1917. What they found was so well-preserved, it was like stepping back into a real-life history lesson.

Check out the full story on NBC, and the incredible photos below.

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8 Ridiculous College Classes (…that we’d totally take!)

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*BEEP*

*BEEP*

*BEEEEEEEEP*

Ah… the charming chime of your 6am alarm clock, making sure you are on your way to first period, or your 7:30am chem class (what were you thinking in scheduling that!?).

Perhaps your mornings would be a little less grouchy if you were on your way to study the science of Hogwarts or the mythical language of Middle-Earth. With the rising cost of education, you can’t help but think WTF to the following classes but… we’re all secretly jealous we didn’t sign up for these literary electives:

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January’s Teacher’s Corner Column: Homework – The Great Debate

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The philosophy of education in the U.S. is always subject to disagreement and controversy, but everyone can agree on this: It’s never, ever static. The dynamics in education often seem like those of a pendulum swinging back and forth, from one extreme to the other, as policymakers, curriculum designers and book writers continue to define and redefine what are now called “best practices.”

The current Great Debate over homework is a perfect example of the way the pendulum swings in education. In “The Case For and Against Homework” at http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar07/vol64/num06/The-Case-For-and-Against-Homework.aspx, Robert J. Marzano and Debra J. Pickering summarize how homework has been accepted or rejected as a good practice since the early 1900s. Reading the summary is enough to give you whiplash:

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Quick Tips to Make It Through Your Fall Term Finals

1. Find an “Accountabilibuddy”

If you’ve been reading eNotes study tips for a while now you’ll already know the importance of making flash cards and creating a study schedule in time for finals week, so here’s a new tip for you. Make a pact with a friend to be accountabilibuddies; you will agree to check in with and keep each other on the studying track leading up to your exams. If one of you strays, the other is “accountabilibuddyable,” and reserves the right to publicly shame you, or at least make you donate $1 to the procrastination jar.

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