Food for Thought: 10 Symbolic Dishes from Classic Novels

Food makes everything better. Using it as a motif, or repetitive symbol, in literature makes reading all the more delicious. Who would not wish to take a bite out of  Madame Bovary’s ultra-chav wedding’s Savoy cake, or know for themselves exactly how bad that gruel was in Oliver Twist. Check these ten famous literature munchies and…

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10 Bookish Costume Ideas for Halloween

Halloween is just around the corner! If you’re looking for a costume idea, we’ve collected our top 10 literature-inspired outfits here by level of difficulty, so you can look bookishly awesome no matter how much time you have on your hands. 1. Ishmael, from Moby Dick You’re just one name tag away from “Call me…

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10 Books You Won’t Believe Were Published

…and the reviewers who actually read them. 1. People Who Don’t Know They’re Dead: How They Attach Themselves to Unsuspecting Bystanders and What to Do About It Author Gary Leon Hill tells of his family’s work luring dead spirits from the bodies of very alive people they’ve held hostage. There are actually quite a few Goodreads…

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After the Dash: Ten Literary Epitaphs

It’s Halloween!  In honor of the creepiest of holidays, why not contemplate your own mortality? GOOD TIMES! Here are ten well-written or interesting conceived final goodbyes from folks (or folks who knew them) who have shuffled off this mortal coil. 1.  William Shakespeare (1564-1616) [Gravestone in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon] GOOD FREND FOR IESVS SAKE…

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Literary America: Ten Places to Visit for National Author’s Day

Mark your calendars and make some plans!  November 1st is National Author’s Day.  In 1929, the General Federation of Women’s Clubs created the day to honor America’s writers; in 1949, the day was officially recognized by the U.S. Department of Congress. The resolution states, in part, that “[b]y celebrating author’s day as a nation, we…

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