A Piece of Shakespearean History: The First Folio Visits Seattle

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Seattle Shakespeare fans got to celebrate in the run-up to the Bard’s birthday (or deathday, if you’re the glass-half-empty sort) with the arrival of the First Folio at the Central Library.

An impressive gilt-edged tome of nine hundred pages, the first compilation of Shakespeare’s plays was opened to Hamlet’s “to be or not to be” soliloquy. Continue Reading ›

Not Just About Two Kids in Love: Top R&J Q&A

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April is a fabulous month for all sorts of reasons: the sun is brighter, the temperature is higher, the flowers are blooming… And this month has a lot to do with Shakespeare. If you haven’t already noticed, we at the ‘Notes are big fans of the Bard, and April gives us even more excuses to talk about him than usual. Not only was our main man born on April 26th (1564), but he died on April 23rd (1616)—that’s two days this month that we get to think all about Shakespeare! And if that isn’t reason enough (and it usually is), this particular year is a special one as it marks Shakespeare’s 400th death-aversary. While the prospect of celebrating someone’s death may strike you as grim, we choose not to think of it that way and rather consider the fact that even four hundred years after his death, the modern world still looks to Shakespeare’s work both for entertainment and as a classic guide to writing, and that’s pretty astounding. Continue Reading ›

Shakespeare Lives! Making the Bard Relevant to Your Millennial Students

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49_eNotes_WilliamShakespeare (3)In “Home-Thoughts, from Abroad,” Victorian poet Robert Browning declares wistfully, “Oh, to be in England / Now that April’s there . . .” Well, it’s April again, and this month would be an especially great time to be in England since it’s the four-hundred-year anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death on April 23, 1616. It’s also the month to celebrate his birth. We don’t know exactly when Will was born in 1564, but he arrived one day in April, and the rest is literary history. Continue Reading ›

How Is Shakespeare Still Relevant 400 Years After His Death? Tell Us…And Win $400!

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Without William Shakespeare, it is likely that eNotes.com would not exist—and what a sad world that would be!

We started out ten years ago as purely a Shakespeare site, and over the years have added thousands of other authors, tens of thousands of book summaries and analyses, and new services like our rapidly-growing Homework Help. Continue Reading ›

Salvador Dalí Draws Shakespeare and His Works [Part 1]

At the intersection of English Renaissance playwriting  and surrealist painting we have a fantastic collection of Shakespearean sketches by Salvador Dalí. It is known that Dalí was a passionate fan of the Bard, and thus combined his dreamlike artistry with the dramatic scenes. Below are some of our favorites.

Read more about Shakespeare on eNotes here, and click on the photos to learn more about each Shakespearean work.

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Happy Birthday, Shakespeare! 4 Ways to Celebrate the Bard

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Today is the anniversary of the Bard’s birth. Check out ways to commemorate the day below, complete with cakes, quizzes, quotes and more.

1. Bake a Shakespeare-inspired birthday cake

Introducing… Cakespeare! To celebrate Shakespeare’s b-day, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London invited bakers to design cakes inspired by the Bard’s prose. See a few below, or check out the full gallery here.

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After the Dash: Ten Literary Epitaphs

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It’s Halloween!  In honor of the creepiest of holidays, why not contemplate your own mortality? GOOD TIMES!

Here are ten well-written or interesting conceived final goodbyes from folks (or folks who knew them) who have shuffled off this mortal coil.

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1.  William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
[Gravestone in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon]
GOOD FREND FOR IESVS SAKE FORBEARE
TO DIGG THE DVST ENCLOASED HEARE
BLESTE BE Y MAN Y SPARES THES STONES
AND CVRST BE HE THAT MOVES MY BONES

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2.  Edmund Spenser (1510-1596)
Here lyes
(expecting the second Comminge of our Saviour Christ Jesus)
the body of Edmond Spenser, the Prince of Poets in his time;
whose divine spirit needs no other witness
than the works he left behind him.

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