Book Covers… Anew!

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We’re all familiar with classic books (hence we call them “classic”). But along with the memorable stories they tell, these books have relatively well-known cover art. We’re betting that if you’re asked about the cover of Catch 22 or a Salinger novel, you’ll have something in mind. For that reason, we at eNotes thought it might be fun to take a look at some landmark titles and imagine what different, updated covers could look like. Below are five “covers” imagined (and painstakingly created) by yours truly! Continue Reading ›

Les Misérables: A Tale of Victor Hugo

In honor of what would be Victor Hugo’s 214th birthday (wow), enjoy a tribute to his most famous and longest-lived work, Les Misérables.

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Let’s start by defining what “les misérables” means. The literal translation is “the miserable ones,” but there remains the distinct possibility that the thematic significance of the title may still be a mystery.

It’s likely that there are a lot of people out there without even an inkling of an idea what Les Mis is actually about, so let’s set the scene: Continue Reading ›

On Being Published and Following Your Passion: Interview with Yumi Sakugawa

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Yumi Sakugawa is a writer and illustrator located in Los Angeles, CA. She works with eNotes as our primary illustrator, and has published two books, I Think I’m in Friend-Love With You and Your Illustrated Guide to Becoming One with the Universe. Her work is sincere and ethereal, striking a  balance between poignant and peculiar. We are obviously fans- but we think you’ll enjoy her perspective and her answers from our quick chat with her.

When did you first become interested in drawing and writing comics? Were you a student that doodled in the margins of your notebooks?

I’ve always loved drawing, writing and making up stories ever since I was maybe five or six years old. And yes, much to the constant exasperation of all my teachers, I was a student who doodled way too much in the margins of my notebooks. Continue Reading ›

Salvador Dalí Draws Shakespeare and His Works [Part 1]

At the intersection of English Renaissance playwriting  and surrealist painting we have a fantastic collection of Shakespearean sketches by Salvador Dalí. It is known that Dalí was a passionate fan of the Bard, and thus combined his dreamlike artistry with the dramatic scenes. Below are some of our favorites.

Read more about Shakespeare on eNotes here, and click on the photos to learn more about each Shakespearean work.

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enotes dali blog Continue Reading ›

New Look, Same Expert Content

Go ahead, judge us by our covers.

eNotes’ study guides are getting a fresh new look, thanks to incredible artist and illustrator Yumi Sakugawa. Sakugawa took 200 of our most popular titles and interpreted each in a fresh and interesting way. The end results are as enlightening as they are beautiful; not only is each image a stand-alone work of art, but an insight into the themes and concepts that make these classics what they are.

We hope you enjoy them as much as us! Browse the images attached to our most popular titles here, or scroll down for a sampling.

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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Heart of Darkness

Continue Reading ›

On the Road, the Illustrated Scroll

Calling all On the Road fans! The following project is a work in progress by illustrator Paul Rogers we think you’ll love.

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That’s right, one day soon lucky Kerouac fans will be able to read the Beat writer’s seminal work, accompanied by some very cool drawings–one for each of its 300+ pages, in fact. Rogers selects his favorite passages and draws an accompanying pic. Check out a selection of some of the best below. To see the progress of the project thus far, see Paul Rogers’ blog entries for On The Road: Illustrated here!

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Top Ten Books Recycled for Art

These artists give books a second life as beautiful works of art, converting everything from outdated computing books to children’s classics into visual masterpieces, all using little more than a scalpel and some imagination. In no particular order (they’re too awesome to rank) here are the top ten artworks created from old books:

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“Pandora Opens Box” by Sue Blackwell.

It is the delicacy, the slight feeling of claustrophobia, as if these characters, the landscape have been trapped inside the book all this time and are now suddenly released. A number of the compositions have an urgency about them, the choices made for the cut-out people from the illustrations seem to lean towards people on their way somewhere, about to discover something, or perhaps escaping from something. And the landscapes speak of a bleak mystery, a rising, an awareness of the air.

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A landscape created out of cut up paper by Scottish artist Georgia Russell.

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One of the masterfully crafted book landscapes from Canadian interdisciplinary artist (and part time anthropologist) Guy Laramée.

We are currently told that the paper book is bound to die. The library, as a place, is finished. One might ask so what? Do we really believe that “new technologies” will change anything concerning our existential dilemma, our human condition? And even if we could change the content of all the books on earth, would this change anything in relation to the domination of analytical knowledge over intuitive knowledge? What is it in ourselves that insists on grabbing, on casting the flow of experience into concepts?

Continue Reading ›