19th Century Patriarchy-Defying Prose and Poems: Works of Austen and Dickinson

Jane Austen and Emily Dickinson, two of the most influential female writers in literature, continue to comment on the man’s world of today more than 200 years later. While they didn’t cross paths in their lifetimes (Dickinson was born 13 years after Austen’s death), they led strikingly similar lives. Both were the second daughters of well-respected…

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At the Intersection of Poetry and Music

Four adaptations of poems set to music: some tender, some bizarre, all personal homages to poems and their masters. Enjoy! “I’m Nobody! Who Are You?” by Emily Dickinson Composed by Israeli singer-songwriter Efrat Ben Zur. I’m nobody! Who are you? Are you nobody, too? Then there’s a pair of us — don’t tell! They’d banish…

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The Big Read: Get Talking About Books

One of the things I miss most about graduate school is the time to luxuriate in conversation with intelligent, engaged people about literature.  Inevitably, someone had a different take on some element of the book that made me re-evaluate my own position or, conversely, helped me feel more confident about an interpretation. In a recent…

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A New Look at Emily Dickinson

For years, scholars have had only one image of the enigmatic Emily Dickinson to go by–that of the poet as a sixteen year-old, taken in 1847 (above). In that time, observers have been unable to help themselves from forming certain ideas of the poet, given this picture of a heavy-lidded, pale, and fragile looking adolescent, coupled…

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