Turn the Page in Style with Literary Nail Art

Instagrammers rejoice: at last you can celebrate your passion for nail art and dystopian literature with Glitterfingersss’ tutorial to “burned paper nails”! We think it’s totally Fahrenheit 451 and right on point for festival season—book festival season, that is. Check it out below.

nailart1

Read on for the 9-step tutorial. It’s actually easier than it looks!

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New Look, Same Expert Content

Go ahead, judge us by our covers.

eNotes’ study guides are getting a fresh new look, thanks to incredible artist and illustrator Yumi Sakugawa. Sakugawa took 200 of our most popular titles and interpreted each in a fresh and interesting way. The end results are as enlightening as they are beautiful; not only is each image a stand-alone work of art, but an insight into the themes and concepts that make these classics what they are.

We hope you enjoy them as much as us! Browse the images attached to our most popular titles here, or scroll down for a sampling.

midsummer-nights-dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

heart-of-darkness

Heart of Darkness

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New to eNotes: Annotated eTexts!

For a long time at eNotes, we’ve displayed eTexts on the site–entire works that anyone can access for free. But recently we’ve worked to make them even better. Welcome to our all new Annotated eTexts!

the raven

What’s an Annotated eText?

Have you ever underlined words or made notes in the margins of your books while reading them? These notes help to re-familiarize you with a passage of text when you flip back through it, or draw out evidence that points to a novel’s main themes. Well, now those notes are made for you, and by the very same teachers who expertly answer your questions in eNotes Homework Help.

With real teachers and professors helping you with your homework, how can you go wrong?

How do I find them?

All of eNotes’ eTexts can be accessed by clicking the eText header link via any page of the site:

eTexts image 3

Pick a work from over 120 Annotated eTexts on this list. A full list of all of our eTexts can be found here. Both lists are alphabetical.

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Top Ten Dishes from the Classics

For her series “Fictitious Dishes,” photographer Dinah Fried staged her favorite food scenes from literature. Via The Picture Show, here’s a sample of her amazing work to delight foodies and book lovers alike.

“I’m interested in creating something that evokes an emotional feeling for myself and others. I wanted to see how other people who had read the books would connect on that level.”

On the Road

on the road

“I ate apple pie and ice cream — it was getting better as I got deeper into Iowa, the pie bigger, the ice cream richer.”

The Bell Jar

the bell jar

“Then I tackled the avocado and crabmeat salad. Avocados are my favorite fruit. Every Sunday my grandfather used to bring me an avocado pear hidden at the bottom of his briefcase under six soiled shirts and the Sunday comics.”

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Top Ten Strangest Questions I’ve Been Asked While Working at a University Library Front Desk

10. Patron: If I was feeling particularly existentialist, what book would you recommend for me?

camus

9. Patron: Hi. I’m looking for a book called Bay Wolves. Can you help me find it?

Me: Sure, let me look it up for you… Hmmm, sorry we don’t have any books by that name. Do you know the author’s name, maybe?

Patron: No, but I think it’s spelled kind of weird, like B-E-O… wolves.

Me: …Do you mean Beowulf?

beowulf cat

8. Patron: Can you help me find the Law Library?

Me: [pulls out a map] The Law Library is right here. You just walk down this street, turn this corner, and you’ll be there.

Patron: Thanks, hopefully they’ll have a book about Newton’s Laws.

Me: Uh, maybe you’re looking for the Physics Library instead…?

Newtons-Third-Law_15990-l

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