Check Out the New Teacher Resources in eNotes’ Study Guides!

All of the helpful tools for your classes are now available in one place: find the Teacher Resources you need in eNotes’ study guides.

Plus, grab a discount to the eNotes Teacher’s Edition with the 15% off coupon included in this post! Read on for more details.

Recently, we received feedback from an eNotes customer to let us know that teachers needed an easier way to find the resources they were looking for on the site – items such as lesson plans, response journals, and quizzes in the given titles they teach. So, we listened! eNotes’ study guides now contain an area devoted just to teachers, meaning it’s easier than ever to find exactly what you’re looking for to help you teach smarter.

An English teacher covering To Kill a Mockingbird, for example, can now find lesson plans and a variety of quizzes listed in one place.

tkamThis gives quick and easy access to two kinds of lesson plans: eNotes’ original documents, which include our own lesson plans and extensive response journals, and lesson plans available from other publishers in eNotes’ document store, many of which are free.

Download unlimited lesson plans for one discounted rate

eNotes’ lesson plans are expert, teacher-created resources that can be purchased individually or downloaded for free by subscribers to the eNotes Teacher’s Edition all-access pass. And now you can grab that special edition pass with a great discount!

Read the rest of this entry »


Calling all teachers: check out our new eNotes lesson plans!

Here at eNotes, we publish new lesson plans and response journals for teachers all the time. Check out our latest additions below! And remember, these items are free for download with your subscription to the eNotes Teacher’s Edition

join-teacher-hdr

jane eyreNew Lesson Plans:

(eNotes lesson plans have been written, tested, and approved by working classroom teachers. The main components of each plan include an in-depth introductory lecture, discussion questions, vocabulary lists, chapter-based questions, essay prompts and a multiple-choice test. They also offer complete answer keys for the instructor.)

Jane Eyre (174 pages)

Things Fall Apart (85 pages)

Death of a Salesman (47 pages)

New Response Journals:

(An eNotes Response Journal is designed to encourage your students to read and write more effectively and with more pleasure. Each Response Journal includes a rich variety of writing prompts: some will take students directly into the text, while others will give students an opportunity to express their thoughts and feelings and to reflect on their own experiences.)

The Hunger Games (26 pages)

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (20 pages)

About our special Teacher’s Edition:

The eNotes Teacher’s Edition currently offers 105 lesson plans, with 3 new plans added each month. Your subscription guarantees you an unlimited number of downloads of these plans and response journals, plus other classroom resources like user-uploaded documents, daily Q&A, and thousands of study guides. For more information on the Teacher’s Edition or a free sample of one of our lesson plans, click here.

Are you a teacher? eNotes employs real instructors as Educators in our Homework Help program for students. Submit your application today and join our team of experts!


Life of Pi: the Book and the Movie

“Which story do you prefer?”

Have you been following the trailers for Life of Pi?

After months of anticipation, I was fortunate enough to attend a screening of it last night. The new movie is the cinematic adaptation of Yann Martel’s celebrated 2001 novel, is directed by Ang Lee, and has been generating Oscar buzz for weeks thanks to its imaginative art direction and astounding special effects. But there’s more about the film you should know…

There are a lot of movie adaptations set to be released in the upcoming months–The Hobbit, Anna Karenina, and The Great Gatsby to name a few–the wait for which brings excitement to the literary masses, though the products often bring disappointment; avid readers time after time conclude that the magic that comes with reading a novel just cannot be translated onto the big screen. And I am usually one of them.

But Life of Pi is a unique case. For one thing, I actually didn’t even enjoy the book all that much. My apologies in advance to the die-hard fans out there, because I know you’re there; the novel has such a polarizing effect, it seems that everyone I’ve ever talked to about it either loved it or couldn’t finish it. On the one hand, its manuscript was rejected by five publishing houses before it was accepted by Knopf, on the other it was endorsed by President Obama in a private letter to Martel as, “an elegant proof of God, and the power of storytelling.” Oh yes, and it won the Man Booker Prize in 2002.

What kind of precedence does that set for its translation into film? Well, having watched the movie, I can say that it’s given me a new appreciation for Martel’s storytelling. His writing, so hard for me to get through on paper, has been transformed into a format that can celebrate all of its surrealist qualities and make them magical. Just watch the scenes on meerkat island if you don’t believe me.

But you’d have to celebrate that surreality to make the film a success. In a novel, the allegorical tale of a boy sharing a lifeboat with a massive Bengal tiger just works. In a movie, the fact that it’s impossible to throw your lead actor in with a real-life mankiller is only upstaged by the greater challenge of bringing character to the animal and making him real. On that I will only say that I was told that fewer than a quarter of the tiger shots in the film depicted a non-CG tiger. Good luck picking out which ones. Not only do we end up believing Richard Parker is real and alive, but we, like Pi, believe in his soul, all thanks to the reality-bending technology of computer graphics and the artistry of Parker’s animators.

Because of his embrace of the novel’s surreality, director Ang Lee has not only managed to retell Martel’s story, but to bring to it a spark of magic that is normally only reserved for the original book, something relatively unheard of in an adaptation.

Based on Martel’s own words from the novel, I think he’d agree:

“That’s what fiction is about, isn’t it, the selective transforming of reality? The twisting of it to bring out its essence?”

Life of Pi

So, are you excited to see a movie based on this bestselling book? What are your thoughts and expectations for movie adaptations, or this one in particular?

More on Life of Pi from eNotes:

The Life of Pi eNotes Study Guide, a perfect reading companion complete with chapter summaries and analysis. Have a question? Post it to our Q&A area for the novel and our expert editors will provide answers.

Test your knowledge of the novel with eNotes’ Life of Pi Study Questions.

Teachers, planning on teaching Life of Pi in the classroom? We have an eNotes exclusive Teaching Unit to help you with that, plus related lesson plans from Prestwick House Publishers to aid your instruction.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 814 other followers