Salinger to Be Published Posthumously

The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010, left instructions to publish his unseen works, including new stories featuring his most famous character Holden Caulfield.

salinger

J. D. Salinger was always a guarded artist. He kept a very small inner circle of only “seven or eight people,” says his son Matthew, outside of which nobody could have known that the author continued to write through the years, let alone that he planned to release any more of his works.

But a new documentary and accompanying book, both simply titled “Salinger,” are said to reveal both Salinger’s instructions to publish a  handful of never before seen stories and details of the elusive writer’s private life. Of the latter, the documentary’s director Shane Salerno says he and writer David Shields have uncovered new details about Salinger’s mysterious first wife–Sylvia Welter, a suspected Gestapo informant–as well as the young Jean Miller (only fourteen when they met) with whom he shared a long correspondence followed by a brief relationship.

For me, those sordid details Salerno and Shields boast of leave a bad taste in my mouth. The delivery, against the wishes of Salinger’s family and close friends, gives them all the credibility and dignity of a TMZ scoop. However, the duo insist that their sources regarding the author’s plans to publish are reliable, being “independent and separate” of one another.

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Top Ten Authors as Teenagers

Ever wondered what the most respected authors of the world might have looked like in their teenage years? Today Flavorwire compiled sixteen photographs of writers in their adolescence. Scroll down to see a Yearbook compilation of the ten cutest, most awkward, most serious, and most likely to write the next great Canadian novel…

A 17 year-old Ernest Hemingway

The gangly and adorable Neil Gaiman

Flannery O’Connor confesses to her high school newspaper that her hobby is “Collecting rejection slips” from publishing houses.

Samuel Clemens, aka Mark Twain, age 15

A carefree, teenaged Allen Ginsberg at 16

Posho Martin Amis with his father, the writer Kingsley Amis

J. D. Salinger’s yearbook photo from military academy, 1936

A 14 year-old Virginia Woolf, then Virginia Stephen

Beautfiul Anais Nin at 19

Margaret Atwood in her high school yearbook, minus the distinctive curly locks

For the full showcase, including Samuel Beckett’s steely eyed gaze, head to Flavorwire.


Salinger’s Letter to Hemingway

(AP Photo/courtesy John F. Kennedy Presidential Library)

If you are lucky enough to be in Boston on Sunday and attending the PEN/Hemingway Awards, you’ll get a chance to sneak a peek at a J. D. Salinger letter to Ernest Hemingway. It was written in 1946, when Salinger and Hemingway were serving in Europe during World War II. In it, Salinger addresses Hemingway as “Poppa” and closes the letter by saying that “[t]he talks I had with you here were the only hopeful minutes of the whole business.” Five years later, Salinger published his masterpiece, The Catcher in the Rye.


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