How To Be Successful at a Large University

Success: “The accomplishment of an aim or purpose” (Merriam-Webster).  Success is what every person should strive to reach every day.  It is the backbone and motivator for all of our wants and needs.  Achieving success in college requires hard work and a little bit of knowledge about how to beat the system.  The university system differs from high school in a plethora of ways.  You don’t have the same classes every day, there are up to 500 students in your classes, there is no mandatory attendance, and your grade can be based on your performance on one or two tests.  If you just graduated from high school and are about to begin college, or are already in college and have a newfound resolve for success, read on to discover how to be successful at a large university.

columbia

1. Define your success.  What are you looking to get out of college?  Is this just the next step in your educational journey?  Do you plan on using it as a stepping stone to a particular job or graduate program?  Do you just want to have fun?  Knowing what you want to get out of college before you begin is important.  Perhaps you want to make a difference on campus and run for a position on student government.  If you want a strong sense of fulfillment, giving back to the community and volunteering can get you there.  I was recruited at UCLA to play baseball, so my goal was to be as successful as I could in the classroom and on the field.

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How to Succeed in Job Interviews

College and high school seniors, graduation day is almost upon us! What a happy and exciting time. But lurking behind that eagerness to rush out into the world is that old nagging reminder—it says, “You need a job. Like, yesterday.” But how to make that happen? Turns out our editorial intern Matt is going through the exact same steps as you…

Don’t worry, this won’t be one of the questions they’ll ask you. Probably.

How To Land a Job in 12 Easy Steps

Getting a job or pursuing your dreams in a career field is often the talk of many people who are looking towards their future.  As a senior in college, so much of the conversation amongst classmates is about what everyone is going to do once they graduate.  These students are beginning to put their future into focus and consider what they want to do for the rest of their life.  There’s a lot of pressure that accompanies this.  How is a 22 year old supposed to know exactly what they want to end up doing for work?  The problem with so many people’s approach is that it is results-oriented rather than process-driven.  Everyone often focuses on the result of landing that job or working in their desired industry rather than breaking it down and taking the appropriate initial steps to naturally get there.

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A Day in the Life of a Student Researcher

Are you studying for a career in the sciences? Not sure where to begin to gather that lab experience that is oh so important for obtaining your degree and landing a great job? Our Math and Science intern Wilson shares his experiences of finding his place as a student researcher and shares the four lessons he’s learnt both inside and outside of the lab.

Lab work doesn’t always involve looking down the lens of a microscope, one thing I learnt in my work as a student researcher studying autism spectrum disorders in children.

For almost 2 years now, I have been a student researcher at UCLA studying the physiology of anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders. This position has opened my eyes up to the professional, research-oriented community and taught me to dismiss some of the common misconceptions I had before I received this opportunity. Here are a few things I learned on my way to becoming a student researcher.

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How to Make the Most of your Study Abroad Experience

Part 2 of  “Another Kind of Green”: 15 helpful tips from our editorial intern on how to prepare for and make the most of your time studying abroad.

“Once in a while when it’s good, it’ll feel like it should.”  In John Mayer’s Song “Stop this Train”, Mayer compares life to a train that’s moving too fast, wanting it to stop.  He acknowledges that every now and again there comes a time when everything’s grooving.  If you tuned into my previous post, part 1 of “Another Kind of Green”, then you already know that while studying abroad everything “feels like it should.”  The experience is extremely amazing and provides great value to college students.  It is the most rewarding, gratifying, adventurous, and beneficial “educational” step I’ve ever taken in my life.  Studying abroad requires careful planning before and during the trip.  Taking the right steps to prepare for studying abroad will ease your transition  and reduce the culture shock of integrating into a new environment and culture.  It can also ensure a good fit between yourself and the educational institution, and even more importantly the country.  By keeping in mind the following tips for the before and during parts of your journey, you will be able to maximize your experience and keep on riding that train.

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Another Kind of Green: How Studying Abroad Can Improve Your College Experience

To study abroad or not to study abroad? It’s a question that confronts college students on a frequent basis, introducing an inevitable flurry of related questions that plague us: when should I go? Where should I go? WHY should I go??

Well, in an attempt to help you tackle those questions for yourself, our editorial intern shares his experiences of studying abroad in Rome and lists the 5 things you will reap by the bucketload should you decide to take the leap (and take it from us, you definitely should!):

“You don’t need to lose it to know that you had it good.” John Mayer puts it perfectly in his song “Another Kind of Green,” playing off the metaphor “the grass is always greener on the other side.” How many times in your life has it taken losing something to make you realize how good you had it? Although the song was referring specifically to relationships, this is true of so many other situations: a tough job, a class that’s giving you a hard time, an initially socially awkward moment, drudging through practice for a sport…

I’ve had this happen to me many times in life. Partly because I’m a fickle person by nature and always second guess my decisions.  A girl I swore I wanted nothing to do with seemed like the greatest thing in the world the second I broke up with her. The one time this hasn’t been the case is when I studied abroad. This was the one time in my life that I knew I was having the time of my life while it was happening. That’s a really cool feeling to have. I remember FaceTime’ing my mom while walking through the cobblestone streets of Trastevere (my neighborhood) with a huge smile on my face explaining my new life on the other side of the world (between her sobs and complaints that she missed me).

Piazza Navona, Rome

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