Top Ten Tattoos Inspired by Children’s Books

Our favorite childhood books stay with us in our minds and our hearts forever. They’re the reason why, mid-life, you can look at the bald patch of the man at your side and think only of the velveteen rabbit, with all his fur loved off. But the only way to really show your love for them is to have them permanently inked on your skin, as the folks below can attest to. Here’s a round up of ten very devoted children’s lit fans:

1. Beatrix Potter‘s Peter Rabbit

2. Stuart Little by E. B. White

3. Eloise

4. The Very Hungry Caterpillar

5. An amazing sleeve depicting the mad hatter scene from Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

6. The opening lines of Watership Down

7. Matilda by Roald Dahl

8. Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are had two astounding entries, so we just had to credit both.

9. The Velveteen Rabbit (definitely a rabbit theme going on here)

10. The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis

Oh and just for good measure because it’ll make you smile…

A little game of Where’s Waldo?

Explore more at Flavorwire’s round-up, and tell us what book from your childhood you’d pay tribute to in a comment below.


Some Pig, Some Book: Charlotte’s Web Turns 60

How E.B. White loved spiders before the rest of the world fell in love with his.

Some children’s books are truly timeless.

When you think of their titles, the very smell of their pages seems to seep from your memory, and you find yourself once again feeling those same emotions you felt on the first reading, or indeed any reading thereafter.

Charlotte’s Web is one of those books.

E.B. White’s classic tale has played a pivotal role in many a child’s upbringing. In fact, in a Publisher’s Weekly poll it was ranked as the most popular children’s book ever published. Today marks its sixtieth year in print.

The tale is so familiar to so many of us that I hardly feel the need to raise a spoiler alert. All the same, don’t read on if you don’t yet know the ending…

The body of the novel may concern a pig, a girl, and a series of barnyard animals to fill the backdrop, but at its heart is a remarkable spider, Charlotte A. Cavatica. Though a spider to many may seem like an unlikely creature to feel empathy for, the author obviously saw differently.

Charlotte’s Web had its beginnings in the Maine farm White ran with his wife Katherine Angell. One October day, White noticed a spider’s web in the corner of his barn. He watched as, over a manner of weeks, the spider in it spread her net wider and wider, eventually laying a tiny egg sac at its center. The spider was never to be seen again. When the time came for White to leave Maine for New York (and the farm for his steady job at The New Yorker), “he put the sac in an empty candy box, punched some holes in it, and absent-mindedly put the box atop his bedroom bureau in New York.”

Some weeks later, that precious egg sac began to breathe life. The author watched as tiny eight-legged spiders crawled out of the candy box, through the air holes he’d made for them.

White was delighted at this affirmation of life and left the hundreds of barn spiderlings alone for the next week or so — to spin webs from his hair brush to his nail scissors to his mirror — until, finally, the cleaning lady complained.

Thus also hatched White’s idea for Charlotte’s Web.

Interestingly, his fascination with and emotional attachment to spiders went back further than those first stirrings of the novel in 1949. White once wrote of the arachnids that “once you begin watching spiders, you haven’t time for much else.” Even one of his love poems to his new bride concerned a spider. This one he wrote in 1929 is titled “Natural History”:

The spider, dropping down from twig,
Unwinds a thread of his devising;
A thin, premeditated rig
To use in rising.

And all the journey down through space,
In cool descent, and loyal-hearted,
He builds a ladder to the place
From which he started.

Thus I, gone forth, as spiders do,
In spider’s web a truth discerning,
Attach one silken strand to you
For my returning.

So White was no novice in making a spider appear beautiful and regal rather than something to be feared. In Charlotte’s Web, he instilled all of the attributes in Charlotte that made us fall in love with her; she was kind, honest, a truly loyal friend, and of course a great writer, too. It wasn’t long before she spun a web around children’s hearts everywhere.

And when we cried at Charlotte’s death, White was right there with us.

So great was the author’s love for his character that in 1970, when it came time for him to record the audio book, he had a difficult time reading the passage wherein his beloved spider passed. In the end, it took 17 takes for White to get through the following paragraph without his voice “cracking or beginning to cry.”

The fairgrounds were soon deserted. The sheds and buildings were empty and forlorn. The infield was littered with bottles and trash. Nobody of the hundreds of people that had visited the fair knew that a gray spider had played the most important part of all. No one was with her when she died.

It wasn’t the first time a reader cried over Charlotte, nor will it be the last. Wilbur may have been some pig, but Charlotte was certainly some spider, and White’s story is one very special book. If those who remember her now have anything to do with it, Charlotte’s story will be celebrated in another sixty years as one of the most beloved children’s novels of our, or indeed of any time.

To hear White read the passage above, head to NPR’s Morning Edition story, which includes an interview with Michael Sims, author of the biography The Story of Charlotte’s Web. You can also listen to E.B. White read an excerpt of Charlotte’s Web via an NPR recording at this link.

Charlotte’s Web on eNotes:

Charlotte’s Web Study Guide

Lesson Plan

and Q&A

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 821 other followers