eNotes for Back-to-School (#eNotes4BTS): Win a Lifetime eNotes Pass and $500 Grant!

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We are amping up for back-to-school so that we’re prepared to help our eNoters with summer reading, pop quizzes, and upcoming exams. To kick off the season and help you transition from summer sun to classroom fluorescents, we’re excited to announce the #eNotes4BTS contest!

What you can win!…

All the prizes are designed to help you transition to back to school, and everyone is a winner!

  • One grand-prize winner will receive a $500 grant and a Lifetime eNotes Student Subscription.
  • Three runner-up winners will receive a 1-year eNotes Student Subscription, a $49.99 value.
  • Everyone that enters will get 50% off an eNotes Student Subscription. Sent via coupon code after the contest ends.

How to Enter

Let us know why you’ll need eNotes for back to school on Twitter and/or Instagram. You can simply tweet it with text, or use images and videos on Twitter or Instagram…the more creative the better!
*You MUST include the hashtag #eNotes4BTS to enter.

Entries accepted August 5 to August 26, by 11:59 p.m. PST. Continue Reading ›

Scholarship Spotlight – August 2015

Every month, we select some of the best scholarships around and post them here on our blog. When you are ready to apply, check out our tips on How to Write a Scholarship Essay!

Power Poetry Scholarship

Amount: $1,000

Eligibility: Applicant must be 25 years of age or younger and be a current or former high school student who will attend or is attending college within the U.S. or its territories.

Requirements: Add an original poem to Power Poetry by Friday, August 7, 2015. You’ll need to register as a member of their community first. Don’t forget to share your poems on social media! Poems with 50 or more shares (which must be sent from the poem page on PowerPoetry) will be the ones the PowerPoetry team reads first!

Due Date: August 7, 2015

To read more information directly, click here!

Continue Reading ›

Grammar How-To: That, Which, and Who

This is Part Four in our Grammar How-To Series.

I’ll be brief. It matters, though maybe not the way you think it does. Or maybe exactly the way you think it does. Take the test and find out.

1. Choose the sentence that makes the most sense.

tell-tale-hearta) Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” that is about a crazy guy who bricks up his enemy behind a wall is an excellent read.
b) Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat,” that is about a crazy guy who bricks up his wife behind a wall, is an excellent read.
c) Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart,” which is about a crazy guy who buries an old man beneath his floorboards, seems familiar somehow. Continue Reading ›

Diversity, Intersectionality, and Inclusivity: #YANeedsMore

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Yesterday the hashtag #YANeedsMore started trending, and we jumped in to watch the conversation unfold.

Not surprising was the number of calls for more intersectionality and diversity; we were pleasantly surprised by the rich insight, feedback, ideas, and personal experiences from hundreds of young adult, and proper adult, tweeters.

The YA genre and particularly its older readers have been criticized for a gamut of faults and short-comings. This trending tag was a cry for a more varied genre, and hopefully writers and publishers will follow to match their readers’ experiences, cultures, stories, and relationships.

Here are some of our favorite #YANeedsMore. Continue Reading ›

The Many Faces of Sherlock Holmes


In honor of the Mr. Holmes movie release this weekend, starring Gandalf Sir Ian McKellen, we wanted to look back at the various faces of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle‘s infamous detective.

The original text describes Holmes as “over six feet” tall and “excessively lean”, with sharp, piercing eyes and a “hawk-like nose” (A Study in Scarlet). But his incarnation on screen has run the gamut from young to old, bookish to brawny. No other character has been portrayed more often on the big screen – over 250 times, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Continue Reading ›

Chapter One Unveiled for Harper Lee’s Wildly Anticipated “Go Set a Watchman: A Novel”

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Fellow literature lovers, take a small sigh of Scout Finch-deprived relief.

We’ve all been holding our breath since Harper Lee’s announcement of Go Set a Watchman early February. This book comes more than 50 years after everyone’s favorite English class novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee’s second novel is scheduled for release July 14, and the first chapter (excerpt below) has been published, alongside beautiful animations, on The Guardian.

Since Atlanta, she had looked out the dining-car window with a delight almost physical. Over her breakfast coffee, she watched the last of Georgia’s hills recede and the red earth appear, and with it tin-roofed houses set in the middle of swept yards, and in the yards the inevitable verbena grew, surrounded by whitewashed tires. She grinned when she saw her first TV antenna atop an unpainted Negro house; as they multiplied, her joy rose.

Continue reading on The Guardian

Pre-order the novel, $15.95 for hardcover or $13.99 for Kindle, on Amazon.

Top E-learning Trends You Can Implement Immediately in Your Classroom

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What do we talk about when we talk about e-learning?

In the past, most courses and learning activities fell on one side of a dichotomy: they were either instructor-led or computer-based, either online or off, either synchronous or asynchronous. Today, the distinction is not quite so clear. Although there are still plenty of e-learning-only courses, blended courses are becoming increasingly popular from elementary to corporate classrooms. Even courses that may not specifically be “blended” are incorporating more digital elements and activities. In this new environment, e-learning is becoming less of a special category and more just a way to describe what happens in classrooms everywhere, every day. Continue Reading ›