March’s Teacher’s Corner: Blended Learning

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In the olden days—really not that long ago—technology in the classroom was an intercom connection with the office and a 16mm projector that showed black-and-white documentaries. When film strip projectors arrived on the scene, they represented real innovation; a film strip machine with audio and auto advance was cutting edge. The term “blended learning” didn’t exist because there was nothing to blend. Continue Reading ›

Buried Under Papers: 5 Grading Survival Tips

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It’s that time again. Actually, if you are an English teacher, it’s always that time. You feverishly comment on 45 drafts, hand them back to students…and receive 50 more. In the meantime, 3rd period’s pop quizzes are getting moldy, six student presentations need to be assessed, your two sections of American Literature need tests corrected, there’s a handful of letters of recommendation that need to be written, and three (or four, or more) classes need to be planned—all by Friday.

Sound familiar? I don’t have the answers, but I do have sympathy and a few tips that have helped me weather a storm of essays for a decade and a half. Continue Reading ›

Salvador Dalí Draws Shakespeare and His Works [Part 1]

At the intersection of English Renaissance playwriting  and surrealist painting we have a fantastic collection of Shakespearean sketches by Salvador Dalí. It is known that Dalí was a passionate fan of the Bard, and thus combined his dreamlike artistry with the dramatic scenes. Below are some of our favorites.

Read more about Shakespeare on eNotes here, and click on the photos to learn more about each Shakespearean work.

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Nine Movies You Didn’t Know Had Literary Origins

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1. The Lion King (and its sequels)

Don’t be fooled by the fur—Disney only superficially disguised Shakespeare’s Hamlet with adorable lion cubs. Scar, a.k.a. Claudius, murders his brother on the sly and takes his throne, leaving young Hamlet—er, Simba—to travel the circle of life alone and conflicted. Fortunately for Simba, Walt apparently didn’t make it to the end of Shakespeare’s masterpiece.

The tensions lingering on Pride Rock in The Lion King 2 make an excellent stage for a furry version of Romeo and Juliet. And in the oddly delightful Lion King 1½, Timon and Pumbaa star in something a lot like Tom Stoppard’s absurd existentialist play, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (minus the dead part). Continue Reading ›