Tacos with Pynchon, Burgers with Hemingway

hemingway_bar

Spencer Tracy and Ernest Hemingway with Friends at La Florida (“Floridita”), Havana, Cuba. Ernest Hemingway Collection. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

In between drinking (Hemingway) and hiding (Pynchon), these two iconic writers were known to procrastinate in the way that many of us who write do: by chowing down.  While stuffing our faces may partially delay the pain of composing, it’s not all duck-and-cover.  Writing often requires mulling. As Umberto Eco notes, “Writing doesn’t mean necessarily putting words on a sheet of paper. You can write a chapter while walking or eating.”

A new discovery for me, by way of the Paris Reviewis a site called Paper and Salta blog devoted to the love of food and literature.  (Maybe I’ll start another called Windex and Waffles, which, granted, does not have quite the appeal of the former but I do tend to clean everything, and then EAT everything, when I have Major Writing to accomplish.) 

Anyway, it’s pretty entertaining to hear about Pynchon and his love of Beer-Braised Chicken Tacos.  Apparently,  Pynchon could often be found

 “wearing an old red hunting-jacket and sunglasses, doting on Mexican food at a taco stand.” Throughout the late 60s and 70s, Pynchon became a regular at El Tarasco in Manhattan Beach (It’s still open today, if you want to follow in his culinary footsteps). Neighbors would frequently spot him chowing down—the notorious hermit, lured into public by a burrito.”

Hemingway had his favorites, too.  Among them was the humble hamburger, pan-fried, not grilled.  Among his papers was found these explicit instructions for cooking Papa a proper burger:

Read the rest of this entry »


Surprise of the year: Franzen is being a jerk again.

Jonathan Franzen

Yes, he who snubbed Oprah and her “schmaltzy” book club, he who lacked the capacity to laugh at the ransom of a pair of glasses kidnapped from under his nose (quite literally), has climbed back onto his high horse again. The author of The Corrections and Freedom now declares in a new Guardian essay his disappointment in authors who turn to Twitter, lovingly casting himself as the reincarnation of Austrian satirist Karl Kraus, aka “The Great Hater.”

Not that you would know who that is, being a techno-communicating cretin and all. I mean, #karlkrausthegreathater takes up a big chunk of 140 characters.

I would explain more of Franzen’s essay for you, but like his other work, I didn’t get through it. So, I’ll just leave you with a link and some idiot friendly bullet points:

Read the rest of this entry »


A Cheater’s Guide to the Classics

DISCLAIMER: If you are a student assigned to read any of the following classics in school, you should ABSOLUTELY read them all the way through! Not only are they classics for a reason, but that’s your job as a student, and as members of the educational community we would be remiss if we didn’t point that out.

If you are, on the other hand, one of the 62% of adults who are simply willing to lie to make themselves appear smarter, well then this article is for you!

That’s right, roughly 6 out of 10 adults claim to have read books they’ve never even opened in an effort to appear more intelligent and impress others. How do they get away with it? Mostly through movie adaptations. But why rely on a director’s interpretation of Great Expectations when walking into the potentially vicious traps set by your dinner party counterparts? I mean, if you really want to get serious about appearing smarter, you’ll have to study with some study guides. And what a surprise–we just so happen to have some of those! 

war-and-peace

You could read the 1,225 pages this Tolstoy classic, or you could just prop it on your bookshelf at home and internally vow to get around to it “one day”

The top ten books people claim to have read, but haven’t, are:

1984 by George Orwell – 26%

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy – 19%

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens – 18%

Catcher in the Rye by J D Salinger – 15%

A Passage to India by E M Forster – 12%

Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkein – 11%

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee – 10%

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky – 8%

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen – 8%

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë – 5%

Titles that just missed the cut are The Bible (3%), Homer’s Odyssey (3%) and Wuthering Heights (2%).

Be serious about appearing smarter: study smarter. Never walk into a dinner party unprepared again!


Salinger to Be Published Posthumously

The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010, left instructions to publish his unseen works, including new stories featuring his most famous character Holden Caulfield.

salinger

J. D. Salinger was always a guarded artist. He kept a very small inner circle of only “seven or eight people,” says his son Matthew, outside of which nobody could have known that the author continued to write through the years, let alone that he planned to release any more of his works.

But a new documentary and accompanying book, both simply titled “Salinger,” are said to reveal both Salinger’s instructions to publish a  handful of never before seen stories and details of the elusive writer’s private life. Of the latter, the documentary’s director Shane Salerno says he and writer David Shields have uncovered new details about Salinger’s mysterious first wife–Sylvia Welter, a suspected Gestapo informant–as well as the young Jean Miller (only fourteen when they met) with whom he shared a long correspondence followed by a brief relationship.

For me, those sordid details Salerno and Shields boast of leave a bad taste in my mouth. The delivery, against the wishes of Salinger’s family and close friends, gives them all the credibility and dignity of a TMZ scoop. However, the duo insist that their sources regarding the author’s plans to publish are reliable, being “independent and separate” of one another.

Read the rest of this entry »


Calling all teachers: check out our new eNotes lesson plans!

Here at eNotes, we publish new lesson plans and response journals for teachers all the time. Check out our latest additions below! And remember, these items are free for download with your subscription to the eNotes Teacher’s Edition

join-teacher-hdr

jane eyreNew Lesson Plans:

(eNotes lesson plans have been written, tested, and approved by working classroom teachers. The main components of each plan include an in-depth introductory lecture, discussion questions, vocabulary lists, chapter-based questions, essay prompts and a multiple-choice test. They also offer complete answer keys for the instructor.)

Jane Eyre (174 pages)

Things Fall Apart (85 pages)

Death of a Salesman (47 pages)

New Response Journals:

(An eNotes Response Journal is designed to encourage your students to read and write more effectively and with more pleasure. Each Response Journal includes a rich variety of writing prompts: some will take students directly into the text, while others will give students an opportunity to express their thoughts and feelings and to reflect on their own experiences.)

The Hunger Games (26 pages)

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry (20 pages)

About our special Teacher’s Edition:

The eNotes Teacher’s Edition currently offers 105 lesson plans, with 3 new plans added each month. Your subscription guarantees you an unlimited number of downloads of these plans and response journals, plus other classroom resources like user-uploaded documents, daily Q&A, and thousands of study guides. For more information on the Teacher’s Edition or a free sample of one of our lesson plans, click here.

Are you a teacher? eNotes employs real instructors as Educators in our Homework Help program for students. Submit your application today and join our team of experts!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 784 other followers