Turn the Page in Style with Literary Nail Art

Instagrammers rejoice: at last you can celebrate your passion for nail art and dystopian literature with Glitterfingersss’ tutorial to “burned paper nails”! We think it’s totally Fahrenheit 451 and right on point for festival season—book festival season, that is. Check it out below.

nailart1

Read on for the 9-step tutorial. It’s actually easier than it looks!

Read the rest of this entry »


The King in Yellow: Analysis and Plot Summary of the Book that Inspired HBO’s True Detective

Image

HBO has a monster hit on its hands with True Detective, a very dark Southern Noir cop show that takes place in Louisiana. The show is littered with references to the 1875 book by Robert Chambers entitled The King in Yellow. The connections between the show and the book are sometimes blunt and direct, such as similar place names, and at times obscure and thematic. But what is The King in Yellow about? Enotes.com has a plot summary and brief analysis. Here’s quick excerpt to get you familiar with the basic concepts of the book:

Read the rest of this entry »


Dear Professor Einstein

Albert-EinsteinAs arguably the most important intellectual of his time, Albert Einstein exchanged letters with powerful contemporaries: fellow scientists, heads of state, dignitaries, philosophers. But what most might not know is that he also corresponded with children around the world.  That’s right–curious children would write and Einstein would reply, even at the height of his career and influence. Their letters back and forth are touching, honest, often hilarious but also poignant, thanks to the tone Einstein took with every note, never talking down to the children. A selection of these can be found in the book Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein’s Letters to and from Children, as well as a sprinkling below.

In a 1920 response to the question of what he looked like, Einstein wrote

Let me tell you what I look like: pale face, long hair, and a tiny beginning of a paunch. In addition, an awkward gait, and a cigar in the mouth … and a pen in pocket or hand. But crooked legs and warts he does not have, and so is quite handsome – also no hair on his hands as is so often found with ugly men.

In 1943, a young girl wrote to Einstein about her difficulties with mathematics in school. He encouragingly replied

Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater.
Best regards
Professor Albert Einstein.

Read the rest of this entry »


The Best Book I Read Last Year

Looking for a good read to begin 2014 right? We have some recommendations for you! Here’s a list of eNotes’ staff members favorite picks from a year of reading. We hope it inspires you when creating your list for 2014.

Clearly the editors, interns, marketing staff and others behind eNotes are a mixed bunch, with high-brow, chick lit, and even photography manuals between us. Check out our reads and let us know what’s on your list in a comment below.

gone-girl-book-cover

Gone Girl

This huge bestseller was probably on many readers’ lists for 2013, with its spellbinding plot and really, pretty horrifying characters. It had me compulsively turning its pages, making Gillian Flynn’s dark thriller easily a one-weekend-read. Warning: don’t pick it up without a bit of time on your hands; you won’t want to put it down without solving the mystery of Amy Dunne’s disappearance.

infinite_jest_20080915

Infinite Jest

One of eNotes’ co-founders selected a throwback for his 2013 pick: David Foster Wallace’s 1996 novel Infinite Jest. The book is set in a futuristic society of North America and has inspired some polarizing opinions from readers for its complex plot, but it has to be admired for its influence over the past two decades of fiction. If you’re looking for a challenging, important read, look no further.

Read the rest of this entry »


2013 National Book Award Winners

Is your Kindle finger itching? Do you have a yearning to go to the bookstore or library but don’t know what sounds good? Well, maybe this will help.  Last night, this year’s National Book Awards were announced. Here is the complete list of winners and finalists.

James McBride took the fiction prize for his novel The Good Lord Bird (Riverhead Books/Penguin Group USA):

the-good-lord-bird-james-mcbride

Abolitionist John Brown calls her “Little Onion,” but her real name is Henry. A slave in Kansas mistaken for a girl due to the sackcloth smock he was wearing when Brown shot his master, the light-skinned, curly-haired 12-year-old ends up living as a young woman, most often encamped with Brown’s renegade band of freedom warriors as they traverse the country, raising arms and ammunition for their battle against slavery. Though they travel to Rochester, New York, to meet with Frederick Douglass and Canada to enlist the help of Harriet Tubman, Brown and his ragtag army fail to muster sufficient support for their mission to liberate African Americans, heading inexorably to the infamously bloody and pathetic raid on Harpers Ferry.  Starred Review, Booklist  –Carol Haggas

Finalists for the prize included:

Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers (Scribner/Simon & Schuster)

Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland (Alfred A. Knopf/Random House)

Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge (The Penguin Press/Penguin Group USA)

George Saunders, Tenth of December (Random House)

The winner for non-fiction is George Packer for The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Read the rest of this entry »


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 780 other followers