Alice Munro Wins the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature

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“A story is not like a road to follow…it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows.”

Canadian writer Alice Munro has been awarded 2013′s Nobel Prize in Literature.  Often heralded as “one of our greatest contemporary writers of fiction,” Munro is best known for her short stories which are accessible yet complex narratives about the human condition.  Her best-known works include “Lives of Girls and Women” (1973), “The Love of a Good Woman” (1998) and “Runaway” (2004). A collection of her work, “Too Much Happiness: Stories,” was published in 2009.

2009 is also the year in which Munro was award the coveted Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work.  Additionally, she has been awarded Canada’s literary honor, the Scotiabank Giller Prize, twice.  She might have won a third but she removed her name from the contenders in 2009 saying that “she wanted to give younger, less-established authors an opportunity.”

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Unpublished Novel by Pearl S. Buck Found in Texas Storage Unit

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I live for stories like this. My children are regularly subjected to garage and estate sales.  They tap their feet and emit long, angsty, teenage sighs as I go through ancient, musty-smelling boxes, looking and hoping for such a gem.

It happened to someone. After forty years, an unpublished manuscript by Pearl S. Buck has been discovered in a Texas storage unit.  The New York Times reports that the manuscript was returned to Buck’s family “for a small fee.”  How the manuscript came to be in Texas is a mystery;  Buck, a West Virigina native,  never lived in Texas, nor did she have family in Texas.

Although Buck’s best-known work today is The Good Earth, in the early twentieth century, many of her other works were widely read. A prolific author, Buck wrote dozens of novels, works of non-fiction, and short stories. In 1938, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first woman upon which the honor was bestowed.

The new novel titled  The Eternal Wonder is described as ““the coming-of-age story of Randolph Colfax, an extraordinarily gifted young man whose search for meaning and purpose leads him to New York, England, Paris and on a mission patrolling the DMZ in Korea that will change his life forever — and, ultimately, to love.”

The publisher, Open Road Integrated Mediasays the novel will be released on October 22, 2013, in both paperback and eBook formats.


Top Ten Summer Readings for 2013

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Ahhhh, summer! Finally, some time for a bit of pleasure reading. Got a gift certificate you’ve been hanging on to? (Ha. Mine are gone minutes after they hit my hands.) Or maybe you are just overwhelmed with choices and don’t want to waste precious free time on something that isn’t so great. Well, we at eNotes want to help you get the most out of your summer reading

Here are ten suggestions offered by my very well-read friends who occasionally hang up their tweed jackets and loosen their professorial buns (no, not hair).  Here you will find a combination of new and older works, both fiction and non-fiction, serious and comedic.  So pick a few and let us know what YOU think!

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1.  Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue by Jane Maas

Are you a fan of AMC’s Mad Men and Peggy and Joan in particular? Curious about what life was really like on Madison Avenue in the ’60s? Then you will enjoy Maas’s exploration of life in the ad game in the 1960s and beyond .

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2.  Confessions of an Ex-Girlfriend by Lynda Curnyn

A good beach read by a first time novelist. A friend says it is “the only romance novel I’ve ever finished.”

“Suddenly single when her aspiring screenwriter boyfriend takes off for a hot job in L.A., bridal magazine editor Emma Carter is forced to reassess her appearance, her job, and her prospects-and take action. A diverse cast of engaging, occasionally offbeat characters, the hilarious sayings attributed to them, and a fast-paced style facilitated by Emma’s pithy sound-bite “confessions” add to the fun in a lively Manhattan-set story that, while not a true romance, leaves the heroine happily pursuing her dreams and involved in a satisfying romantic relationship. This work may appeal to those who enjoy Bridget Jones-type books and like their stories urban, trendy, and slightly ambiguous. Curnyn is a fiction editor and lives in New York. This is her first novel. ” – Library Journal

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Happy 87th Birthday, Harper Lee!

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Last night, I found my sixteen-year-old daughter in bed  a full hour early. In her hands was Harper Lee‘s classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird. “I want to see what is happening with Scout. I’m worried about her,” she explained.

My daughter, like millions of other readers, has become enthralled by the coming-of-age story of Scout Finch as she navigates the racially-charged world of Alabama in the 1930s.

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Yesterday, April 28, 2013, marked the 87th birthday of Harper Lee, the novel’s author. To Kill a Mockingbird was immediately popular and has sold more than 30 million copies worldwide. It was an instant critical success as well, winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. In 2008, London’s The Telegraph named To Kill a Mockingbird “the greatest novel of all time.”

The novel, Lee’s only published work, may not have ever been.  She was struggling to make ends meet in New York, working as a ticket agent for Eastern Airlines. While in the city, she became friends with the composer and lyricist Michael Brown and his wife, Joy. The three became very close. In December, the Brown’s gave Lee an astonishing gift: a years’ salary with a note that read, “You have one year off from your job to write whatever you please. Merry Christmas.” Within a year, Lee had completed the first draft of  Mockingbird. 

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Hot on the heels of Lee’s Pulitzer was the film being made of her work. The movie was released in 1962 starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch. To Kill a Mockingbird won three Oscars and was nominated for five more. In 2003, AFI named Atticus Finch the greatest movie hero of the 20th century.

Want more? How about some trivia?!

Five Quotes from To Kill a Mockingbird

  1. Atticus told me to delete the adjectives and I’d have the facts.
  2. I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what.
  3. Before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself.
  4. Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.
  5. You really never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.

Seven Quotes: On Reading & Writing

  1. More than a simple matter of putting down words, writing is a process of self-discipline you must learn before you can call yourself a writer. There are people who write, but I think they’re quite different from people who must write.
  2. There’s no substitute for the love of language, for the beauty of an English sentence. There’s no substitute for struggling, if a struggle is needed, to make an English sentence as beautiful as it should be.
  3. I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career, that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide.
  4. Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself…It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.
  5. It was like being hit over the head and knocked cold. I didn’t expect the book to sell in the first place. I was hoping for a quick and merciful death at the hands of reviewers but at the same time I sort of hoped that maybe someone would like it enough to give me encouragement. Public encouragement. I hoped for a little, as I said, but I got rather a whole lot, and in some ways this was just about as frightening as the quick, merciful death I’d expected.
  6. Now, 75 years later in an abundant society where people have laptops, cell phones, iPods, and minds like empty rooms, I still plod along with books. Instant information is not for me. I prefer to search library stacks because when I work to learn something, I remember it.
  7. You must come to terms with yourself about your writing. You must not write ‘for’ something; you must not write with definite hopes of reward. (Source).

Still want more?? Test your knowledge of Harper Lee or her classic novel!  Take our fun, interactive quizzes!

To Kill a Mockingbird Quiz 

Harper Lee Quiz


Happy Birthday, Toni Morrison

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Today, February 18, marks the 82nd birthday of Toni Morrison. Morrison was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1988 for her novel Beloved.  She is the United States’ only living literary Nobel Prize winner (awarded to her in 1993).

Morrison was born  ‘Chloe Wofford’ to working class parents in 1931. She grew up in Lorain, Ohio and converted to Catholicism at age twelve.  Her baptismal name was “Anthony,” which is where “Toni” comes from; Morrison is her married name. In 1958, she married fellow Howard University professor Harold Morrison. The couple had two children but divorced in 1964.

In the late 1960s while a professor at Howard, Morrison began writing with an informal group of friends. She developed her first story there about a black girl who longed to have blue eyes. This story was the basis for her novel The Bluest Eye (1970).  Other novels have enjoyed both critical and popular success, including  Sula (nominated for a National Book Award in 1975), Song of Solomon (1977), Beloved (1987) and Jazz (1992).

Morrison has been called a writer “who has enriched our literary heritage over a life of service, or a corpus of work”  and one whose  “novels [are] characterized  by visionary force and poetic import [and] give life to an essential aspect of American reality.”

Here are ten of the most memorable lines from Morrison’s works and lectures:

1.  “Make up a story… For our sake and yours forget your name in the street; tell us what the world has been to you in the dark places and in the light. Don’t tell us what to believe, what to fear. Show us belief’s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul.” ―  The Nobel Lecture In Literature, 1993

2.  “She is a friend of my mind. She gather me, man. The pieces I am, she gather them and give them back to me in all the right order.”  - Beloved

3.  “Don’t ever think I fell for you, or fell over you. I didn’t fall in love, I rose in it.” - Jazz

4.  “I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.”

5.  “What difference do it make if the thing you scared of is real or not?” - Song of Solomon 

6.  “In this country American means white. Everybody else has to hyphenate.”

7.  “Along with the idea of romantic love, she was introduced to another–physical beauty. Probably the most destructive ideas in the history of human thought. Both originated in envy, thrived in insecurity, and ended in disillusion.” –  The Bluest Eye

8.  “Love is or it ain’t. Thin love ain’t love at all.” - Beloved

9.  “Gimme hate, Lord,” he whimpered. “I’ll take hate any day. But don’t give me love. I can’t take no more love, Lord. I can’t carry it…It’s too heavy. Jesus, you know, You know all about it. Ain’t it heavy? Jesus? Ain’t love heavy?” - Song of Solomon 

10.  “All paradises, all utopias are designed by who is not there, by the people who are not allowed in.”


The Great American Teach-Off for 2013!

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Know a teacher who could use and deserves $10,000?

Well, hurry, as it is almost last call for nominating an educator who shows innovation and dedication to their craft.  The $10,000 classroom grant will be awarded by GOOD Partnerships and the University of Phoenix. There will be twenty finalists selected from teachers of grades Kindergarten through Twelfth this February 15, 2013 at noon PT.  

Voting for the finalists begins March 4 and “in a course of five weeks, the GOOD community will vote for their favorite teacher. At the end of the five weeks, the top voted K through 6 teacher and top voted 7 through 12 teacher will each receive a $10,000 classroom grant.”

What are the judge looking for? “[T]eachers that are not only changing the lives of their students, but also their community. We want to hear all about the teachers that are integrating technology into the classroom, doing community outreach with their students, or pushing their students to learn and think in different ways so that they can graduate successfully and achieve beyond the classroom.”

For ideas and inspiration, you can watch videos of last year’s winners, Terry Dougherty and  Daryl Bilandzija.  Good luck to all the great candidates out there and don’t forget: the deadline for applications is this Friday


National Book Critics Circle Finalists Announced

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It’s award season, not just for movies, but for books as well. Yesterday, the National Book Critics Circle announced its finalists for the 2012 publishing year.  Since 1976, the  National Book Critics Circle has given the award in order “to promote the finest books and reviews published in English.”  The American organization has selected thirty books eligible for a total of six prizes.  Those six categories are autobiography, biography, criticism, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

Two of the titles in contention have already received much critical and popular acclaim, Katherine Boo’s  Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity. 

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and Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk  by Ben Fountain

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Other Fiction Finalists:

Laurent Binet’s HHhH, about the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich

Zadie Smith’s London-set NW

Adam Johnson’s The Orphan Master’s Son, a frightening look into Kim Jong Il’s North Korea. (Both Fountain’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk and  Binet’s HHhH are first novels.)

Biographies

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Robert A. Caro’s The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson 

Tom Reiss’s The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo , about General Dumas, father of the famous novelist

Lisa Cohen’s All We Know: Three Lives  about early 20th-century trend setters Esther Murphy, Mercedes de Acosta and Madge Garland

Lisa Jarnot’s Robert Duncan, The Ambassador from Venus: A Biography

Autobiography

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My Poets by Maureen N. McLane

Swimming Studies by Leanne Shapton

The Distance Between Us by Reyna Grande

In the House of the Interpreter by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East by Anthony Shadid

Poetry 

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Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations by David Ferry

Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys by D. A. Powell

Olives: Poems (Triquarterly) by A.E. Stallings

Non-fiction

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Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

For a complete list of finalists, click here.

The winners will be announced on Thursday, February 28, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.


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